The houses

Masonry houses PAGE PAGE
 
Roman houses. 
Hypocauste heating system 
discovered by Th. Vacquer 
on the Ile de la Cité. 
BHVP. 
Roman houses. Hypocaust heating system discovered by Th. Vacquer on the Ile de la Cité. BHVP.


  Wall painting fragment showing a man's head in heroic aspect. 2nd century CE. Photo: CVP.
Wall painting fragment showing a man's head in heroic aspect. 2nd century CE.
Photo: CVP.

Reconstruction and restoration of a painted plaster wall-an attempt has been made to reconstitute the decoration. Late 2nd-early 3rd century. S. Vaugiraud, H. Eristoff, and F. André. CVP.

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Animation au survol de l'imageReconstruction and restoration of a painted plaster wall-an attempt has been made to reconstitute the decoration. Late 2nd-early 3rd century.
S. Vaugiraud, H. Eristoff and F. André. CVP.

  Construction

At the end of the 1st century CE, the fabric of the city became denser. As unbuilt spaces were divided into lots and Lutetia's first public monuments appeared, timber-framed houses were progressively replaced by ones made of stone. Nevertheless, the two types of houses continued to coexist.
This architectural shift from earth to stone can be characterised in several ways. Stone house construction respected at least two factors imposed by previous constructions. First, they kept the general orientation of the house, although they tended towards a more systematic use of the north-south axis. Second, they respected the limits of the parcel of land.

As is common in Roman construction, the walls were made of a double layer of small limestone blocks, held together by a lime mortar and completed with a filler of small stones. These walls were systematically dismantled and the stones reused. However, the existence of walls made entirely of masonry has been shown by the discovery of several intact sections and fragments of wall paintings in which the imprint of stones can be seen. The thickness of the walls suggests that these houses could have had an additional level.
  These more permanent houses had features that reflect urban prosperity: the appearance of cement floors, large underground rooms, stone stairways and drainage systems. Some owners built hypocausts and private baths, and continued to decorate their homes with murals, numerous traces of which have been found.